Author Topic: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today  (Read 9058 times)

Tom128

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Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« on: August 21, 2010, 05:29:42 pm »
"Three months after Apollo 17 returned home in December 1972, then-U.S. President Richard Nixon ordered the distribution of fragments from the rock that Cernan and Schmitt collected, since labeled sample 70017, to 135 foreign heads of state, the 50 U.S. states and its provinces. Each rock, encased in an acrylic button, was mounted to a plaque with intended recepient's flag, also flown to the Moon."

The value of the gifts are estimated to be over several million dollars each. Click on the link below to see where your State or Country's Apollo Goodwill gift is located.  I thought Jules, Thomas and Geoff would enjoy seeing the one on display at the Natural History Museum, London.



Apollo 16 sample

Here is a link to Collect Space that has a listing of the Goodwill Moon Rocks.

http://www.collectspace.com/resources/moonrocks_goodwill.html


Below is a more definitive description/analysis of the actual lunar specimen itself.  It was the last moon rock Apollo 17 collected before they left and thus was thought of as symbolic representing the last Apollo effort.  This particular lunar specimen (70017) was the most widely dispersed moon rock gift given to States and Nations.

70017
Ilmenite Basalt
2957 grams

http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/lunar/lsc/70017.pdf

Jules has written a great blog article on the Goodwill Rocks http://blogs.zooniverse.org/moonzoo/2011/02/28/lost-and-found-the-uk-apollo-17-goodwill-moon-rock/
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 01:08:30 am by Tom128 »

Thomas J

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2010, 08:31:35 pm »
Great article, Tom, this gives me an excuse to go to the natural History Museum (again)  :)

jules

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2010, 10:31:27 pm »
Ooooh - and I'm off to London next week..... 8) 8) 8)

jules

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2011, 06:13:15 pm »
Had to resurrect this thread for this!!

Tom128

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2011, 09:51:40 pm »
Luckily, not all Moon rocks are illegal to own, just NASA Apollo mission Moon rocks.  There are Lunar meteorites that have been found at various places on Earth, especially in the Antarctic:




"The new specimen was found by a field party from the U.S. Antarctic Search for Meteorites program (ANSMET) headquartered at Case Western Reserve University. The meteorite was discovered on Dec. 11, 2005, on an icefield in the Miller Range of the Transantarctic Mountains, roughly 750 km from the South Pole. This 142.2 g black rock, slightly larger than a golfball and officially designated MIL 05035, was one of 238 meteorites collected by ANSMET during the 2005-2006 austral summer."

http://blog.case.edu/case-news/2006/09/19/new_lunar_meteorite_found_in_antarctica

Here is Katie Joy's Moon Zoo blog article on Lunar meteorites that is well worth a revisit.

« Last Edit: May 23, 2011, 10:02:21 pm by Tom128 »

Tom128

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2011, 05:36:15 pm »
The State of Alaska may have found its Goodwill Moon Rock.


Edit: The article actually refers to an Apollo 11 Moon rock gift.

" An Apollo-era moon rock gifted to the State of Alaska as a goodwill gesture by President Richard M. Nixon and thought to have been lost has been in the possession of a man who found it as a teenager in 1973, according to court documents obtained by KHOU 11 News."

Ignore the photograph of the moon rock container used in the photo op at the above link as it is not from the official mounted plaque and flag but a Moon meteorite chip holder that one finds for sale on Ebay.  New value estimates on these Goodwill rocks are around five million dollars.  Check out the PDF below that gives some background information on the missing Moon rock.  Looks like the guy did Alaska a favor and should be rewarded as they did not put much value on the Lunar sample, at the time, and threw the damaged  plaque with rock attached on the garbage heap after the museum fire.


Here is the link to the court documents as a PDF file.

« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 10:26:54 pm by Tom128 »

jules

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2011, 09:38:22 pm »
Wonder where the rest of the missing samples are?

Tom128

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2011, 10:24:29 pm »
Well, after more checking it appears that the news article was referring to an Apollo 11 moon rock similar to what the UK has at 10 Downing Street in the study:



http://www.number10.gov.uk/tour/location_009.php


I found this on Wikipedia:

"Alaska

Elizabeth Riker was assigned the task of hunting down the Alaska Apollo 11 Moon Rock by her professor. On August 18, 2010, in a story she wrote about her investigation in the Capital City Weekly newspaper, of Juneau Alaska, she stated that after conducting a thorough investigation for Alaska's Apollo 11 Moon Rock she has concluded that it is missing. She advised that she planned to continue to look for the moon rock and asked for the help of the citizens of Alaska to accomplish her goal of finding it.[2][3]

In 1973, there was a massive fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum where the moon rocks were being housed. Coleman Anderson (a crab fishing captain who was on the TV show, Deadliest Catch) went to the museum to scrounge through the garbage from the fire to see if there would be anything worth saving. Coleman was a kid at the time. He found the moon rocks, cleaned them up over the next few years and he still has them. To clear title to the rocks he filed a lawsuit against the State of Alaska, asking the Court to deem the rocks his sole property.[4] "

The State of Alaska Goodwill Moon Rock is in the Alaska State Museum:



http://www.collectspace.com/resources/moonrocks_goodwill.html


As a side note on Apollo 11, there is a slice of a Lunar sample collected during that mission in the center of the upper sphere on the Space Window at the Washington National Cathedral:



« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 10:43:24 pm by Tom128 »

Geoff

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2011, 07:49:00 am »
NASA has lost track of many space samples: Missing space samples

Dynamo Duck

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2012, 07:47:34 pm »
Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm sure that there was a time, about twenty or so years ago, when NASA and/or the USA government thought that the moon rocks that had been brought to earth were totally worthless. If I am right, the same kind of people worked for the BBC in the 60's and 70's and destroyed videos of some of the great TV shows from that era. Morons the lot of them.  >:(

Cheers. Ewan.

Geoff

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Re: Where the Apollo Goodwill Moon Rocks are today
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2013, 07:20:13 am »
Some missing Moon dust samples have been discovered by an archivist at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory.

Missing Moon Dust Discovered

Quote
Vials of moon dust collected by the first men to walk on the moon have been discovered in storage in California after being missing for more than 40 years.