Author Topic: Boulder Tracks  (Read 148280 times)

Lovethetropics

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Boulder Tracks
« on: April 08, 2010, 03:23:35 am »
All the questions and images about boulder tracks can be posted on this thread.

There is a separate thread for boulders and boulder fields.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2010, 01:18:03 pm by Geoff »

NGC3172

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2010, 12:31:48 pm »
Hi Lovethetropics  :)

We also need a 'boulder field' menu item within the 'mark interesting features' button...

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2010, 12:34:24 pm »
Hello!   Yes we do BunnyBB.  We are waiting for a few of the Moon Zoo crew to come and answer so many questions we have...
Right now we have more questions than answers.  ???

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2010, 01:04:14 pm »
I have a nice example of boulder tracks (at last!):


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v8/slices/000011517.jpg
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 11:25:33 am by Geoff »

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2010, 01:05:59 pm »
I have a nice example of boulder tracks (at last!):



Wow, so many of them!  I have never had any kind of tracks on my images.  :-\

jules

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2010, 02:19:04 pm »
Good idea for a thread. :) I'm cross posting this as I suppose they may just be boulder tracks.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2010, 10:02:13 pm by jules »

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2010, 09:21:20 pm »
Do we know why the boulders move at all?   ???

jules

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2010, 10:05:14 pm »
Do we know why the boulders move at all?   ???

I suppose that some boulders thrown out as a result of volcanic activity (albeit millions of years ago) might have landed on slopes and then rolled down.

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2010, 10:10:59 pm »
So smoothly?  Hard to understand...
Do we know if those boulders are round?  The ones I have seen are not round and I haven't seen boulder tracks yet...maybe that's the answer.  ???

jules

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2010, 10:58:52 pm »
Good point. Shouldn't have said "rolled" as maybe some roll and some slide down slopes.

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2010, 11:24:11 pm »
Good point. Shouldn't have said "rolled" as maybe some roll and some slide down slopes.

Have you read about a place in Nevada where there are  rocks that slide on a flat surface?  You can see their tracks...I think the ice that forms underneath makes them slippery and that's why they glide.
Maybe the Moon dust works like that too... :-\

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2010, 08:23:07 am »
You could also get boulders and rocks thrown up by asteroid strikes. Not sure how far these would go, depends on the size and type of asteroid.

Asteroid strikes would also cause moon-quakes which would shake loose boulders from crater rims which would then roll down.

jules

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2010, 08:57:30 am »
You're right. Some of the impactors have thrown boulders far and wide - Tycho being the obvious one. And there's nothing there to disturb the tracks once they are made. Give or take an astronaut or two. ;)

Have you read about a place in Nevada where there are  rocks that slide on a flat surface?  You can see their tracks...I think the ice that forms underneath makes them slippery and that's why they glide.
Maybe the Moon dust works like that too... :-\

I'll go look that up Aida - thanks!

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2010, 09:06:02 am »
Here's a link to an article about the sliding rocks: http://geology.com/articles/racetrack-playa-sliding-rocks.shtml

Caro

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2010, 09:47:56 am »
More boulder tracks.  :D