Author Topic: Boulder Tracks  (Read 159922 times)

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2010, 09:55:22 am »
Hi Caro

Great example of boulder tracks! They look like they've bounced along the surface so maybe the result of an impact?

Looks like the edge of  an impact crater on the bottom right so maybe this is where they originated?
« Last Edit: April 14, 2010, 09:57:08 am by Geoff »

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2010, 08:43:02 am »
Here's a link to an article about the sliding rocks: http://geology.com/articles/racetrack-playa-sliding-rocks.shtml

Thank you so much Geoff...I guess wind driven rocks are out of the question on the Moon.  ;D

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2010, 01:24:32 pm »
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 11:26:19 am by Geoff »

Thornius

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2010, 04:09:53 pm »
Forget the boulder tracks...What are those ODD patches above that?  They look almost like holes left by glacial ice-block melt!

No...wait...THOSE ARE PLATEAUS!!!  Apparently the remnants of a hard surface that was pulverized except for a few spots.  That's just as intriguing as to what could have left just those areas elevated whilst everything else "eroded" away around them.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2010, 04:13:35 pm by Thornius »

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2010, 04:24:34 pm »
Forget the boulder tracks...What are those ODD patches above that?  They look almost like holes left by glacial ice-block melt!

No...wait...THOSE ARE PLATEAUS!!!  Apparently the remnants of a hard surface that was pulverized except for a few spots.  That's just as intriguing as to what could have left just those areas elevated whilst everything else "eroded" away around them.

This is quite an interesting area - I've posted another shot of this area called "Pork Chop Hill".

I find it hard to work out what is what sometimes with the lighting.  It does look a bit like an area that has been created by water but I doubt that happened here!

Thornius

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2010, 05:17:38 pm »
I've found a couple of more pictures of these ODD rock formations.  I can't tell if they are elevations or depressions in many cases.   I've saved them using a Screen Capture and will process and post them later.

Caro

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2010, 07:49:00 pm »
More boulder tracks.  :)


jules

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2010, 11:18:51 pm »
More boulders and tracks.

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2010, 12:48:48 am »
More boulders and tracks.


Jules,  that's a lot of tracks!  :o :o :o ;D

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #24 on: April 22, 2010, 09:20:44 am »
A bouncing boulder!


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v8/slices/000010824.jpg

If you look to the right of the bottom left-hand corner you can see a line of very small craters left by the bouncing boulder at the end of the tracks.

Thomas J

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #25 on: April 22, 2010, 05:11:49 pm »
That's brilliant, Geoff.

It really is a 'Bouncer'.

I assume the weaker gravity allows for many more bounces.

Thornius

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2010, 12:33:20 am »
It has a pattern of TWO bounces close together, followed by a longer pause, that hints at an irregularly shaped boulder.

Lovethetropics

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2010, 01:01:31 am »
It has a pattern of TWO bounces close together, followed by a longer pause, that hints at an irregularly shaped boulder.

You're right Thornius!  ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..- ..-

It's like a Moon Morse Code and we have to decipher it.  ;D ;D ;D

Geoff

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2010, 11:09:58 am »
Good spot Thornius!  I missed that completely.

Thomas J

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Re: Boulders
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2010, 02:13:24 pm »
I noticed, in some of the other images, that the indents follow a pattern of small and large suggesting the these irregular boulers may sometimes 'tumble'.