Author Topic: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer  (Read 8635 times)

JFincannon

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2014, 06:09:30 pm »
This diagram shows that they add the signals from the EVA suits and the LM mike.  It just seem unprovable that the LM mike was open or closed.  I doubt it was always open.
From "APOLLO EXPERIENCE REPORT - VOICE COMMUNICATIONS TECHNIQUES AND PERFORMANCE" NASA TN D-6739

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #16 on: December 25, 2014, 10:13:37 am »
I guess I missed the meaning of the astronaut tossing something at the LM.  When I saw it, it didn't make sense that he would toss anything, especially at the LM.  Then, looking at the transcript and other video showed as they were assembling things, they were removing covers and tossing them far away to not clutter up the local environment.  But the astronaut must have been a bad aim to hit the LM! 

Anyway, its hard to figure out why the "hit" of the LM would cause a sound on the voice loop.  One possibility is that somehow there is a open mike on the voice loop in the LM.  Not sure this is possible or how to deduce this. How many headsets were in the LM and could they have been "on"?  The other unconfirmable possibility is that it is some coincident sound (a cough or breath).  Amazing timing if so.

If they were truly on the moon, there would be zero possibility that the sound was caused by an open mic on the voice loop in the LM because the LM was depressurized when the astronauts left it. The LM has no airlock, so when the hatch opens the cabin is in a vacuum until the astronauts go back in then close the hatch and re-pressurize it. So even if there was an open voice mic, it wouldn't have been capable of picking up any sound in the vacuum. But the only voice communication during the missions was via the headsets.

You may recall the arguments by others that we should have heard LM engines on descent in broadcast, and the standard reply is that we don't hear that because the only microphones on board were in the helmets, and those were not capable of picking up such vibrations as sound.

It's not relevant to this clip of Irwin we are now discussing, but those who have argued that the mics in helmets couldn't pick up the vibrations from ship, will be the very same folks who will be forced to argue - with no scientific basis - that hammering and many other sounds were, in fact, picked up via solid state vibrational conduction.  On one hand they will be forced to argue that the roaring engines could not have caused solid state vibrational conduction into the boom mics in helmets on descent, while at the same time, they will be forced to argue that the hammering and other noises we feature could only have been caused by solid state vibrational conduction.

Again, that is another argument for another sound. In this instance, the sound appears to have been picked up by Irwin's mic in his helmet, and if you listen closely you can hear the telltale background noise
of his spacesuit backpack, which continues for a split second after the clank.

As for that sound being a cough or breath, the suggestion is obviously wrong. Based upon the ALSJ notes, it appears that Irwin unwraps the band that holds the LiOH canister in the MESA table, he unravels it, tosses it towards ship, and the metalic lock on the sturdy cord clanks into the ship loudly. You can see it ricochet off the ship in both the ALSJ clip and the raw footage. As the trailer shows, the clip has been cropped at ALSJ, but you can still see the cord hit the ship. And you can see more of the ship in the raw uncropped footage. Our best guess is that it is the cord, referred to in ALSJ as a "band".

The only argument available to NASA on this issue is to say - "you are not seeing what you are seeing, you are not hearing what you are hearing." They will be required to make this same argument for quite a few things in our film, because there is no other argument left after the technical facts are revealed. Your argument regarding coughing/breathing is the only thing NASA can possibly put forward on this clip, because the facts/specs leave nothing else to them. It's obviously not a cough you are hearing, nor is it breathing. It is the object thrown by Irwin that clanks against the ship in perfect time with the video. It is what it appears to be. People may choose not to believe their eyes and ears. There is nothing I can do about that. If that is the only argument we leave NASA, then we have accomplished our goal with the film, which is to get the true facts out to the people. What people do with those facts is not my concern.

I am comfortable in my belief that anyone who sees our film in its entirety will know for certain that aspects of these broadcasts are fraudulent. Whether they are willing to say so in public is another issue and not of my concern.

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #17 on: December 25, 2014, 10:56:18 am »
This diagram shows that they add the signals from the EVA suits and the LM mike.  It just seem unprovable that the LM mike was open or closed.  I doubt it was always open.
From "APOLLO EXPERIENCE REPORT - VOICE COMMUNICATIONS TECHNIQUES AND PERFORMANCE" NASA TN D-6739


We need to go deeper into Apollo Experience Report TN D-6739, which is where you got this diagram. https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/tnD6739VoiceCommTechnqs.pdf

The diagram you show is on page 8, but the one above that on page 7 is for the Command Module, and in that one you can see where the "microphone" plugs into the audio center. But in the CSM, the audio centers and the pre modulation processor were in two boxes (see diagram below), whereas in the LM, there is only one box. The Experience Report first shows a diagram of CSM schematic (see below), then goes on to explain:

"The LM communications equipment
was similar to that of the CSM. Functionally,
this equipment was grouped as in the
CSM: audio centers, USB, and vhf. However,
in the LM, the audio centers and the
pre modulation processor were in one box
referred to as the signal processor assembly."

And so it is made clear that both the CSM and LM used similar "audio centers", and these have the microphone input plugs used in both the CSM and LM. Then the Experience Report offers the diagram you published here to show the difference between the two box system of CSM and one box system of LM, where the LM diagram uses the term "LM microphone" to illustrate where the headset plugs directly into the "Sum", whereas in the CSM, the microphone audio center plugs first into "automatic gain control" then the signal is sent to the "Sum".

The designation "LM Microphone" is not to a separate on board kind of speakerphone mic (if that is what you are suggesting - I'm not sure)... but rather "LM Microphone" in the schematic you posted refers to where the headset plugs into the audio center of the LM.


« Last Edit: December 25, 2014, 11:41:04 am by filminco »

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #18 on: December 27, 2014, 01:16:09 am »
Before continuing the discussion, I just want to thank JF for his excellent questions. It is valuable to our film to engage in technical discussions with people who know their way around the issues. I truly value your opinions, knowledge and curiosity. Our film is meant to establish truth. If anyone here, or if any of the professionals we are speaking with currently unearth anything that calls our conclusions into question before or after we release the film, I will report that back to the community accurately. I would not have a film if it weren't for encountering this forum's discussion of Alan Bean's hammering sounds on Apollo 12. Thank you for tolerating what must seem unbelievable to many of you.

Continuing from my previous reply, let's look at your analysis a bit closer, JF: "This diagram shows that they add the signals from the EVA suits and the LM mike."  As stated previously, there is no separate "LM microphone", there is only an LM microphone jack in the audio center. When the astronauts are in the LM, headsets are connected to the audio centers via the Comm Cables in the umbilical cord that connects all of their suit monitor data communications and voice transmissions:

"The astronauts headsets are used for all voice communications...The headsets are connected to the audio panels by separate umbilical cables. These cables also contain wiring for the biomedical sensors in the constant-wear garment...The audio center is the assimilation and distribution point for all spacecraft voice signals."

[emphasis added. info quoted from http://www.apollosaturn.com/asnr/p173-188.htm]

This makes clear that the "headsets are used for all voice communications". There are no other microphones.

So we've discussed that the cabin was depressurized upon EVA making the inner LM subject to vacuum conditions. And we've established that the only voice communications possible were through astronaut headsets. Now I want to discuss in detail the following two excellent questions raised by JF.


Anyway, its hard to figure out why the "hit" of the LM would cause a sound on the voice loop.  One possibility is that somehow there is a open mike on the voice loop in the LM.  Not sure this is possible or how to deduce this. How many headsets were in the LM and could they have been "on"?   

Let's discuss and determine the amount of headsets on board Apollo 15. At launch, Commander David Scott, Lunar Module Pilot James Irwin, and Command Module Pilot Alfred Worden wore their "Comm Carriers" (aka Snoopy Caps) on board for launch. According to the Apollo 15 Stowage List, there were also 3 Lightweight Headsets stowed at launch in section A8 of the CSM. Here is the official stowage list. https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15stowage.pdf  No other headsets/microphones were on board. That makes a total of 6 microphones available in the CSM at launch. That list also informs us that no other headsets were stowed in the LM at launch.

The same list also tells us that 2 of the 3 lightweight headsets were to be transferred later to the LM for use by Scott and Irwin. However, the lightweight headset assigned to Worden malfunctioned upon attempted use in the CSM, so he kept Irwin's Lightweight Headset while Irwin took the broken one to the LM, and it never got used on the mission, causing Irwin to rely on the Snoopy Cap in the LM. Scott used his Lightweight Headset in the LM extensively. The broken headset was jettisoned to oblivion with the LM. See the Apollo 15 Mission Report https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/ap15mr.pdf .

So there were 3 working microphones/headsets on the LM. At the time of the incident in question, when Irwin and Scott were outside the LM during the first EVA using their Snoopy Caps, there was 1 functional Lightweight Headset in the LM. The question above by JF also mentions the possibility of an "open mic" in the LM during the EVA. His next question also raises the issue as follows:

Quote from: JFincannon link=topic=4199.mseg20274#msg20274 davte=1419444570
This diagram shows that they add the signals from the EVA suits and the LM mike.  It just seem unprovable that the LM mike was open or closed.  I doubt it was always open.
From "APOLLO EXPERIENCE REPORT - VOICE COMMUNICATIONS TECHNIQUES AND PERFORMANCE" NASA TN D-6739

JF states that the issue of whether there was an open mic in the LM seems to be "unprovable".  Because the inside of the LM was in a vacuum, I believe the issue to be moot. But with one extra functional mic/headset on board the LM at the time of the suspect audio event, I will take a moment to explain why it is provable that there was no open mic in the LM.

Both the Snoopy Caps and Lightweight Headsets connected to the LM Audio Centers through the "Comm Cables" contained in the LM umbilical cords.

The Apollo 15 LM Lunar Surface Checklist tells us - at "Page 2-10, Suit Donning" - that both the LM Comm Cables and the Headsets were stowed prior to EVA.

Page 2-10 - https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15sur037.gif (see attached below)  Apollo 15 LM Lunar Surface Checklist - https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/surface15.html

Also on Page 2-10, it states that the "Audio CB" is closed at the end of that checklist. That refers to the Audio Circuit Breaker, which starts the Page 2-10 checklist open, but ends in the closed position.

Additionally, Page 3-1 of the Lunar Surface Checklist - "Cabin Prep EVA-1" - states: "Stow All Loose Items Not Required For Eva" - https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15sur039.gif .

The A15 Stowage List tells us that the Lightweight Headsets were stowed in section F18 of the LM - https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15stowage.pdf 

So with the LM Comm Cables and Lightweight Headsets stowed, there was no possibility of an open mic during EVA.



« Last Edit: December 27, 2014, 02:21:45 am by filminco »

JFincannon

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2014, 03:11:19 pm »
Given the inside LM mikes were disconnected and that there were no others and that it was depressurized anyway, the only other thing I can think of was that maybe the thrown item hit the EVA antenna on top of the LM. 

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2015, 08:50:52 am »
Given the inside LM mikes were disconnected and that there were no others and that it was depressurized anyway, the only other thing I can think of was that maybe the thrown item hit the EVA antenna on top of the LM.

The sound caused by the object hitting the ship is a mechanical wave. The antenna does not transmit mechanical waves, it transmits electromagnetic waves. The antenna is not a microphone. If you talk into it, it won't send your voice. If it did, then you would not need a microphone. Furthermore, the ship is supposed to be on the moon, in a vacuum, so it does not matter what part of the ship the object hits. No sound should have been made. But there was a sound made, and that sound was recorded in the broadcast.

The suspect audio event was recorded by the microphone inside Irwin's helmet which picked up the mechanical wave of the object hitting the ship when that mechanical wave sound was converted to an electromagnetic wave by his mic/radio and sent to the antenna along with the sound of his suit air supply fan. The air supply fan is telltale audio forensic evidence pinning the source for the sound of the object hitting the ship to Irwin's microphone. Not only can this be heard, it can be seen in the wave form by audio forensic experts. Neither astronaut was transmitting over their VOX hot mics before the object hits the ship.

Perhaps you are confused by the term used by ham radio operators "tap the antenna" which actually means "tune the antenna", and this is not done by actually touching the antenna:

"There are several designs for impedance matching using an autotransformer, which is a single-wire transformer with different connection points or taps spaced along the windings." 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antenna_tuner



JFincannon

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2015, 02:46:05 pm »
If the object hit the VHF EVA antenna, I would think it would change the impedance temporarily.  So it doesn't have to be a microphone, it is carrying the signal.  It seems equivalent to adjusting the connection between a microphone and its amplifier.  The problem with the antenna possibility is that the antenna seem to be on the other side of the LM and pretty high.  Although the low gravity was enabling them to toss objects very far away, I don't know if the object (the camera rack?) went over the LM.

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2015, 03:28:37 pm »
If the object hit the VHF EVA antenna, I would think it would change the impedance temporarily.  So it doesn't have to be a microphone, it is carrying the signal.  It seems equivalent to adjusting the connection between a microphone and its amplifier.  The problem with the antenna possibility is that the antenna seem to be on the other side of the LM and pretty high.  Although the low gravity was enabling them to toss objects very far away, I don't know if the object (the camera rack?) went over the LM.

You can see in both clips, one at alsj and the raw uncropped footage that the object bounces off the ship on its way up. It ricochets after hitting the ship on the way up as it makes the clank sound. It does not make it over the ship. Also, hitting an antenna does not cause the transceiver to transmit, and neither mic was transmitting before Irwin throws cord. If the mics were activated and transmitting, It is possible to cause static electricity by touching an antenna or causing interference, and that would be a familiar hissing static sound, not one clear distinct clank sound event.

It is definitelty not at all similar to the connection between a live mic cord and amp re impedance. If you have reference to such phenomenon, please post it.  It is moot point because the object bounced off ship on the way up.


And that clank is not the sound of static electricity. It is the sound of the LiOH cord/band hitting the ship.
The suit fan noise is also in the sound transmitted from inside Irwin's helmet. And that fan noise would not be there if the helmet mic was not the source of the clank sound. The sound is exactly what it appears to be. This is a smoking gun on its own that the broadcast is fraudulent. When examined in total with the Apollo 12 audio from Honeysuckle by Bernie Scrivener, it is plainly obvious that a few errors were made at times when the helmet microphone attenuation was set to transmit at low sensitivity.




JFincannon

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2015, 04:01:14 pm »
I think the best way to rule out the hit EVA antenna hypothesis is that the object and sound coincide on the astronaut side of the LM.

Another thing to rule out is whether they actually took atmospheric pressure readings there.  It is said that sound can still transfer at 10^-4 N/m^2, so although it is claimed that the Moon's pressure is 3*10^-10 n/m^2, perhaps there are local variations.  I have not reviewed where they got the surface pressure measurements (Surveyor?, Apollo?).

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #24 on: January 02, 2015, 05:02:50 pm »
I think the best way to rule out the hit EVA antenna hypothesis is that the object and sound coincide on the astronaut side of the LM.

Another thing to rule out is whether they actually took atmospheric pressure readings there.  It is said that sound can still transfer at 10^-4 N/m^2, so although it is claimed that the Moon's pressure is 3*10^-10 n/m^2, perhaps there are local variations.  I have not reviewed where they got the surface pressure measurements (Surveyor?, Apollo?).

Excellent questions and analysis again, JF. Thank you.

If NASA can convince the scientific community that there is a sufficient atmosphere on the moon for sound to travel, they are greater sorcerors than I imagined. And if that were the case, we ought to hear so much more sound. If there was sufficient atmosphere for the mics in helmets to pick up the object hitting ship, then we would also hear the roar of the ship as it landed, and we would hear all kinds of sounds throughout. But I will look into itjust the same.

Unless the moon has a selective atmosphere...and yes, that was a joke :)  But it is a joke with teeth because the mics in the helmets are themselves selective, triggered by audio events loud enough to overcome attenuation and noise canceling directional characteristics. This is why you dont hear the suit fan or simple ordinary breathing all the time. The mic is set to a certain sensitivity that is adjustable. If they set it to very sensitive, it will pick up sounds loud enough to trigger it. In this case, I dont imagine Irwin was paying close attention to where he tossed the object, and it may propagate unplanned repurcussions in history. The clank heard round the world!




JFincannon

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #25 on: January 02, 2015, 07:35:54 pm »
Even with some transient, localized enhanced atmospheric pressure due to events such as lunar out-gassing/venting of below ground (related to TLPs?), I doubt the pressure level would rise sufficiently to permit the transfer of sound from the LM surface to the suit mike.  But I thought I would mention it anyway.

I am baffled about the discarded object.  I had thought it might be the camera bracket based on the Apollo 15 final lunar surface procedures, but you mention a LiOH cord/band.  I do not see in the procedures where they mention removing it or discarding it.  Am I missing something?  They state “Unstow and place ECS LiOH in pallet pocket”.  A LiOH cannister does seem to be what the astronaut is handling before he tosses the object.  Maybe unstow means, remove and discard some cord.

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #26 on: January 02, 2015, 09:46:02 pm »
Even with some transient, localized enhanced atmospheric pressure due to events such as lunar out-gassing/venting of below ground (related to TLPs?), I doubt the pressure level would rise sufficiently to permit the transfer of sound from the LM surface to the suit mike.  But I thought I would mention it anyway.

I am baffled about the discarded object.  I had thought it might be the camera bracket based on the Apollo 15 final lunar surface procedures, but you mention a LiOH cord/band.  I do not see in the procedures where they mention removing it or discarding it.  Am I missing something?  They state “Unstow and place ECS LiOH in pallet pocket”.  A LiOH cannister does seem to be what the astronaut is handling before he tosses the object.  Maybe unstow means, remove and discard some cord.

It's actually discussed in the ALSJ:

120:52:17 Irwin: (Still at the MESA) You can tell, Joe, I have the geopallet on the back end of the Rover. I don't know whether it's locked on there properly yet.
120:52:24 Allen: Roger, Jim.

    [Comm Break]

    [Jim has removed a replacement ECS Primary LiOH canister from the right end of the MESA and, after removing and discarding a "band" puts it in the EVA-1 pallet. At the Rover, Dave stands upright and inserts the bottom of the high-gain staff into the attachment sleeve with no apparent difficulty. To lock it into place, he then reaches down to knee height with his left hand and, in order to get a little lower, moves his feet backwards and gets on his toes in a deep knee bend. As he does so, the front of the Rover moves down, indicating that he is putting some weight on it. When he rises, the Rover rebounds. After securing the mast, he unscrews a knob on the mast, pulls out a telescoping mast section to raise the umbrella to its full height, and retightens the knob. Finally, he grabs the high-gain cable and removes a protective cap from the connector.]

120:53:30 Irwin: (Now at the back of the Rover) Well, it looks like the geopallet is secured to the Rover.
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15.lrvload.html 

----------------------------

I added the italics and bold print above, but the ALSJ put the quotation marks around "band".

Here is a picture of the LiOH canister locked into the MESA table by the band (cord). It looks something like an insulated bicycle cord/lock, and there are metallic pieces on the ends of the cord that look like bullets. There is also a metal top bar that goes over the canister as it is in the MESA table. I'm not sure if that top part came off with the band/cord. It may be that part which hits the LM, or the metallic ends. The tone of the hit would imply the bullet looking part in my opinion.

LiOH canister and band/cord locked to a MESA table  https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a13/ap13-S69-57061HR.jpg

LiOH canister and band/cord gone from a MESA table https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a13/ap13-S69-57058HR.jpg

Watch Irwin carefully in the clip. He certainly does appear to unravel the object, then he reaches back for tossing leverage and releases it towards the ship.

Regarding the atmosphere issue, this page at nasa.gov discusses various observations caused by there being no atmosphere on the moon. http://history.nasa.gov/SP-168/section2a.htm 
NASA will never argue that the sounds were recorded that way. It's impossible.


Also, I managed to secure a professional to be interviewed for the field of vhf transceiver transmission antennas etc. He assured me that hitting an antenna with an object would, under very specific conditions, only cause static and that it would never mimic the sound of the object hitting it. He said to the best of his knowledge, it would never sound like a clank. Furthermore, the antenna would only transmit such static if there were a transmission in progress. The mics were not transmitting for sure, but he told me to check whether the transceiver was on full time. My research indicates that the transceiver was not continuously on and therefore the antenna would not be capable of transmitting static while the astronauts were not transmitting. The only exception to this is when an astronaut would begin talking, then pause inbetween words... the VHF transceiver used a noise-suppression oscillator to keep the transceiver on for those short pauses in between words:

"The VHF transceiver. - The most significant design features of the LM VHF transceiver
were its small size and low power consumption. Two design techniques were
used to incorporate the design requirements and still have a lightweight, efficient unit.
One of these was to provide audio-input clipping of approximately 40 decibels. This was
changed to 20 decibels to provide maximum signal audio power without loss of intelligibility.
Secondly, the carrier was modulated by keying the transmitter on and off at the
audio rate, a technique which allowed the use of transistors (with an efficiency of
approximately 85 percent) in the RF power output stages. Heavy modulation and poweramplifier
transformers were not required. With this modulation technique, the transmitter
would be off during pauses between words. Therefore, a noise-suppression
oscillator (operating above the audio range at 30 kilohertz) was added to keep the transmitter
on during word pauses; this feature stabilized the automatic gain control (AGC)
in the CSM receiver. The resulting system provided the efficiency required and was
compatible with standard AM equipment."


APOLLO EXPERIENCE REPORT
LUNAR MODULE COMMUNICATIONS
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19720023255.pdf

I would be psyched to get that guy on film in his Ham shack lair. Would be a very cool visual, but I'm not sure it's necessary or useful since the point is moot as you indicated. If I do interview him, we will discuss everything in this thread, and if you like JF, I will give you a credit for technical consulting. Your questions lead to this interview subject.  But I agree with you that the VHF antenna was not hit as it was on the other side of the ship, and the clip shows the object clearly doing a ricochet off the astronaut side.

« Last Edit: January 02, 2015, 09:53:02 pm by filminco »

JFincannon

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #27 on: January 02, 2015, 10:02:28 pm »
I missed that part of the transcript!

No thanks regarding me getting "technical credit", if you don't mind. I only dreamt up explanations which you eliminated with your research.


filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #28 on: January 02, 2015, 11:12:04 pm »
I missed that part of the transcript!

No thanks regarding me getting "technical credit", if you don't mind. I only dreamt up explanations which you eliminated with your research.

You are a great sparring partner. And that is so valuable when heading for a big fight. Thanks. I'll post more stuff for discussion in the days ahead on some other issues to continue training sessions!

filminco

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Re: NASA NOT SOUND official trailer
« Reply #29 on: March 25, 2015, 07:41:04 pm »
The name of the film has changed and the sound issue is one of five segments.  My research has revealed some truly incredible finds and the sound is probably the least of NASA's worries, although that segment is batting cleanup and packs its own strong punch.

Honored humbled and thrilled to announce that my new feature documentary MOON HOAX NOW will have its world premier on April 17, 2015 at 10:15PM for the opening night of the 8th Philadelphia Independent Film Festival, University of the Arts, Levitt Theater 401 South Broad Street (on the corner of Broad & Pine Streets)
Philadelphia, PA 19102. This is a truly gorgeous theater, and it is a very big year for PIFF as the festival is being run in conjunction with Philly Tech Week which is sponsored by some heavies like Comcast et al. I want to thank Festival Director Benjamin F. Barnett and Screening Chair Melissa O'Donnell for their continuous support of my work. This will be the fourth year in a row I have screened at PIFF and the rewards have been priceless. Furthermore, this will be a double feature screening of my films. More on that to follow. I hope to see YOU there.

FILMINCO PRODUCTIONS presents MOON HOAX NOW a documentary film by award winning filmmaker Jet Wintzer.