Author Topic: What is this! - surely man made  (Read 2208 times)

bdp003

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  • Bengt de Paulis, Swede living in Finland
What is this! - surely man made
« on: December 21, 2014, 06:40:01 pm »


Hello.

I am Bengt in Finland, and have registered a week ago.
I have lots of time, being pensionair  :-)
so I have done maybe 100 pict this first week.

Big suprice for me, when I came across this pict surely with manmade objects and tracks.

See attachment!

But what is it...Moon Lunar Rover?...but it has a toppy shadow.
or Start platform?

Please help me identify.

Thanks.  :)

/Bengt de Paulis
Finland

bdp003

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2014, 06:59:40 pm »

I surely marked it as Spacecraft hardware and tracks.
But who have access to the database and can find the coordinates?
for a closer view

/Bengt

bdp003

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2014, 07:46:22 pm »


I believe I found the answer:

Lunar Rover
the toppy shadow is from low angle sun and the Rovers antenna.

/Bengt :-)

Geoff

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2014, 08:15:39 pm »
Hi Bengt and welcome to Moon Zoo.

Your image looks like boulder tracks rather than Rover tracks. See this thread: Boulder Tracks

It would help if you posted the coordinates of the image so we could check the area. The How to Post Images thread should help.

You can see tracks from the Apollo Rover and the Soviet Lunukhod landers in the Moon Zoo images.

Let us know if you have any other questions and enjoy your time on the Moon!

bdp003

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2014, 08:18:22 pm »


Thank you Geoff.

But surely you see more then tracks.

See my last posted picture.

Where can I find the coordinates?
and then how to use them?

/Bengt

jules

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2014, 12:53:12 am »
Hi  Bengt! If you click on "My Moon Zoo" in the menu top right of the classification screen you can see your recent images and favourites listed. If you click view more information on the one you want to examine you will find lots of information about the image including the coordinates. Also if you right click this image and choose copy image location you can paste it here (using the image icon). There's more information about posting images here.

Hope you are enjoying the Moon! If you want any further help please ask. :)

And I agree with Geoff - you found some good boulder tracks and boulders.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2014, 12:55:02 am by jules »

bdp003

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2014, 06:58:27 am »


Thank you Jules.

The picture
Longitude: 1.67648
Latitude: 48.2953

But why cant you and Geoff see what I see
the Rover with antenna!
on the right side of the tracks

Thanks for feedback.

/Bengt

bdp003

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2014, 07:21:32 am »

Image Info

Geoff

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2014, 09:08:43 am »
Hello Bengt and thanks for the coordinate information.

I was able to find the area of your image by using the QuickMap feature and this is an image of the area showing the tracks and a large boulder next to the tracks:


Lat 48.29 Long 1.68
by zooite, on Flickr

The white object in the centre of the image is a large boulder. There are no known manmade objects in this area.
If you look at the Lunar Lander Coordinates thread, which shows all known manmade objects on the Moon, you will see there is nothing within the range of your coordinates.

This next image is from slightly north of your original image and shows some boulder tracks with the boulders that formed the tracks:


Boulder Tracks
by zooite, on Flickr

If you would like to explore this area yourself you can go to this link: http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc/view_lroc/LRO-L-LROC-3-CDR-V1.0/M113947886RC
On the left-hand side it displays a lot of information about the image. At the top left there are some download options. I always use the "Download CDR PTIF" option. Once you have downloaded the file you need an application to browse the image. I use an Apple Mac and use the "Preview" application for image browsing. I assume that there is something similar on the PC.

Please let me know if you have any questions about the above.

bdp003

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2014, 09:47:07 am »


Thank you Geoff.
 there is nothing within the range of your coordinates.

I have to accept that statement, but it surely looked like 4 symetrically placed wheels.

Is it possible to find the Rover
Coordinates?

Geoff

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2014, 10:17:10 am »
Jules did something about the Apollo 17 landing which includes the rover, here: http://forum.moonzoo.org/index.php?topic=467.msg8357#msg8357

I will look around later and see if I can find more info.

jules

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Re: What is this! - surely man made
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2014, 12:41:56 pm »
Hi Bengt. The scale on your image is set at the highest resolution - 0.5 metres per pixel - so the boulder must be around 10 metres wide. That would be one huge rover! :) I think we have all mistaken boulders for spacecraft at some point.  It does take a while to "get your eye in" and get to know the different features of the terrain. One of my first images was this one:



I was convinced they were foot print / rover tracks to and from from space hardware. Turned out is was 2 boulders having rolled down a hill. :D