Author Topic: Big Moon Dig intro and request  (Read 2497 times)

Tom Riley

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Big Moon Dig intro and request
« on: October 29, 2014, 03:41:50 pm »

Dear Moon Zoo,

   I am mastering a project, The Big Moon Dig, designed to use e-games based on real science data to bootstrap our way back to the Moon.  We now have about two years work in on this project.

   I would very much like access to any images you have of our two best lunar settlement sites (Mt. Malapert, and Massif Scott A).  I would be most happy to do the crater work for these sites and the surrounding terrain in return.

___________________-

 
Massif Scott A (image attached) as seen from above the South Pole (LRO Data/NASA, USA)

       For your reference, Massif Scott A Massif (our best site) is at:

       24.0E to 38E, about 36 kilometers, a peak of eternal light
       -84.7S to -85.4S, about 20 kilometers

   The main site is on an ancient east-west basin rim (South Pole Aitken Basin) about 120 kilometers from the lunar South Pole.  Directly below this ridge are several permanently shaded craters (Hawthorn, etc.) which are good sources of volatiles.   As you can see in the LRO altimeter derived image above there are at least four trails with slopes less than 15 degrees leading from our site to the dark craters.  Any good rover can handle 15 degree slopes.
____________-

A more detailed discussion of the Big Moon Dig can be found at:

    Big Moon Dig Web Site:
    http://bigmoondig.com/BigMoonDig.html

    Game Development Document (GDD)
    http://bigmoondig.com/Games/BigMoonDigGDD.pdf

One easy way to quickly understand our approach is to read our science fiction short story:

   “Big Moon Dig”, Science Fiction Short Story (16 pages):
    http://bigmoondig.com/Stories/BMDBigMoonDigStory.pdf    


   Thank you,

   Tom Riley
   The Big Moon Dig



Geoff

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2014, 08:53:11 am »
If you want images of specific places on the Moon you should use the LRO QuickMap site: http://target.lroc.asu.edu/q3/

You can visit any area of the Moon and zoom in. Once you've found a site you can capture an image.

There is also the LROC Camera site: http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc/ where you can download the NAC image for specific areas.

You will need to play around with these sites to learn how to use them, not much help documentation around.

Tom Riley

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2014, 05:11:10 pm »
Thanks for the information.  I was able to find narrow angle camera images of my area of interest at the Baltimore Hackathon.

The problem now is how to edit the large .IMG (very large and lostless) and .tif (much smaller but some loss) files.  I need to crop and then rotate them.

The light-weight graphics editing programs I normally use will not let me work with such large files or even read the IMG ones.

Can you recommend a major graphic editing program that is known to allow reading and then editing of the LRO narrow angle camera images?

Geoff

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2014, 09:38:04 pm »
For minor editing (cropping, etc) of NAC files I use Preview on the Mac - I don't have experience with PCs so not sure what is available for them.

I only work with the NAC files which are .tif images and they seem to be easy to work with on the Mac.

Sorry I can't be of more help - maybe someone who uses a PC will respond.

Tom Riley

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2014, 04:00:04 pm »
The free image editor software program GIMP for Windows definitely will read .tif files and do editing. 

I am still low on the learning curve and there seem to be complications.  The images seem to be laid out North at the bottom and with East and West reversed.  The .tif also seem to have 7 layers to all look the same.

There is a GIMP add-on that claims to allow reading of the big IMG files but I have not got that to work.

Is there a document that simply states what the .tif files are exactly?

jules

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2014, 03:01:11 pm »
Hi Tom, there's no document I'm aware of. I use Photoshop to view the .tif files and I haven't found anything to handle .img files,

Tom Riley

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2014, 01:32:45 pm »
Thanks for the reply.

I now understand how the image is arranged on the page.  It depends on whither the satellite was moving north-to-south or south-to-north at the time the image was taken.  The images I work with all either need to be rotated 180 or swapped north for south.  This GIMP can do.

The tif files appear to have multiple layers.  They all look alike to me.  Do you know what the layers are?

Tom Riley
The Big Moon Dig


JFincannon

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2014, 06:31:14 pm »
I recall those are at different resolutions to help create Zoomable displays.  I think the first is max resolution and the second is *2, then *4, etc.

Tom Riley

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Re: Big Moon Dig intro and request
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2014, 02:52:26 pm »
Thanks, I clearly need the first layer.