Author Topic: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids  (Read 29709 times)

jules

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2011, 06:16:36 pm »
There's an explanation here about the mirroring. About half way down. Paragraph starts with "The two cameras..."
« Last Edit: March 02, 2011, 06:18:21 pm by jules »

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #31 on: March 04, 2011, 04:46:10 pm »
Thanks!  That is interesting.

jules

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #32 on: March 30, 2011, 05:29:13 pm »
Hi JF - did you get my PM?

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #33 on: May 03, 2011, 07:38:54 pm »
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/news/index.php?/archives/382-Anomalous-mounds-on-the-King-crater-floor.html#extended
These look familiar.
"One interpretation of the mounds is that the King impact melt remained hot long enough after accumulating as a pond, and partially crusting over during cooling, to still "ooze" here and there through holes or cracks in the fresh crust. The soft melt quickly cooled after reaching the surface and built itself up vertically while spreading out laterally at each point where this happened ... think of pressing a board with holes in it on a layer of wet mud or toothpaste. "

"Or perhaps the mounds formed in a way completely different from this scenario. Such are the problems of planetary science, and we can always rely on Nature to surprise us by presenting situations that do not lend themselves to easy interpretation or classification; hence the "anomalous" status for today's Featured Image."

Too true.

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #34 on: May 13, 2011, 08:53:13 pm »
This looks interesting:

The First International Planetary Cave Research Workshop:  Implications for Astrobiology, Climate, Detection, and Exploration will be held October 25–28, 2011, at the National Cave and Karst Research Institute <http://www.nature.nps.gov/nckri/> , 400-1 Cascades Avenue, Carlsbad, NM 88220 USA (phone:  575-887-5518). The workshop will also include a one-day field trip. The First International Planetary Cave Research Workshop is a follow-up to the 2008 Lava Tube Workshop held in Grant, New Mexico, which brought together researchers with interests in lava tubes from diverse backgrounds, ranging from image analysis to modeling to robotics. The workshop is the first in a continuing series of meetings that are intended to promote the exchange of knowledge and ideas between planetary and terrestrial scientists interested in cave exploration and research across the solar system. In recognition of the broad scope, interdisciplinary nature, and strong international interest in this topic, the participation of any interested scientist with relevant theoretical, experimental, or field experience is strongly encouraged. The first announcement is now available on the workshop website: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/caves2011/ <http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/caves2011/> To be added to the mailing list to receive reminders and other pertinent information related to the meeting, please submit the Indication of Interest form <https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meeting_portal/iofi/?mtg=caves2011> by June 24, 2011. NOTE:  The indication of interest form is part of the USRA Meeting Portal <https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meeting_portal/> , which requires users to set up a personal profile to access our electronic forms (setting up a profile is quick and easy, requiring only about four minutes of your time). Further details regarding guidelines for abstract submission, meeting registration, and other logistical details will be included in future announcements.

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #35 on: May 25, 2011, 06:38:15 pm »
Not in Copernicus Crater, but it looks like a collapse of a void, just not far enough to create a bunch of blocks.
M144702076LC


Thomas J

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2011, 08:22:48 am »
Not in Copernicus Crater, but it looks like a collapse of a void, just not far enough to create a bunch of blocks.
M144702076LC



This one is great, thanks JF.

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #37 on: September 13, 2011, 09:33:21 pm »
Looks like a paper from the Cave Conference is out and includes an image of the cave/hole/pit I found and mentioned here and mentions what I think are my 'collapsed voids'..... "Collapse features over areas of melt pond drainage suggest additional sublunarean voids. Both types of cave offer intriguing exploration and habitation opportunities."
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/caves2011/pdf/program.pdf
Ashley J. W. * Robinson M. S. Hawke B. R. Boyd A. K. Wagner R. V. Speyerer E. J. Hiesinger H. van der Bogert C. H.
"Lunar Caves in Mare Deposits Imaged by the LROC Narrow Angle Cameras" [#8008]
www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/caves2011/pdf/8008.pdf

Tom128

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #38 on: September 14, 2011, 03:50:49 am »
Very interesting JF!

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #39 on: September 14, 2011, 01:21:58 pm »
So do you know if they read MoonZoo to have seen these Copernicus caves I spotted or did they spot them before me and what are these >140 collapse features they are talking about?  Do they have a public database of these features or is it all secret?  MoonZoo is nice enough to spot things and share, why don't they?  Should we also keep things under our hats until we publish them?

Tom128

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #40 on: September 14, 2011, 01:47:30 pm »
Hi JF,

I know on Galaxy Zoo they have come across some novel finds and published them.  I do not think MZ has anything set up like that. May be something for the Mods to inquire about. Jules, Geoff and Thomas do their best to get interesting finds posted on the IOTW, Facebook and the MZ blog.  That may be the way to go for now.  Maybe instead of holding back unique finds you PM the mods, and negotiate for a fast track to the blog or explore alternatives with them.  It would be a shame not to see some of the great pics you come up with here on the Forum.

Tom

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #41 on: September 14, 2011, 03:55:31 pm »
Not being a lunar scientist, is there an official method to notify someone of these kinds of finds?  Or do people just not care.  I recall there is a service to notify as soon as you see a small body/comets/nova (No, I do not mean the International Star Registry  :P ).  I guess in those cases they want to get other observers as soon as possible, while any finds anyone makes in the MoonZoo-world do not seem like that (they will be there forever, so no hurry).  In the case of transient events, like impacts or plumes of gas, I would think these would be reported to someone. 

If the ASU folk already have spotted all of these objects and are keeping them in their back pockets for their next paper, then why are we working on this?  We don't know if we found something they already have.  I know they (ASU) took the images and are examining images on their own so it seems fair for them to get credit on their work.  They said they had >140 negative relief features, which sounds pretty interesting, but I guess we have to wait for them to publish each one.  On the other hand, we are dumping everything we find at MoonZoo. Whether they at ASU notice the MoonZoo work is unclear.  They have not mentioned MoonZoo on their site once, so perhaps they never look at it.  Given that they are the principle investigators and repository of images, this is not good. 

Also, I still haven't seen the database of requested targets yet. (i.e. http://target.lroc.asu.edu/output/lroc/lroc_page.html)
« Last Edit: September 15, 2011, 01:38:17 pm by JFincannon »

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #42 on: September 22, 2011, 01:56:54 pm »
The attached image was brought to my attention by an interested researcher referred to as "Copernicus".  I had downloaded the latest images from LRO for the Copernicus area but somehow overlooked this new cave/pit image. 

M157730473L
http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc/view_lroc/LRO-L-LROC-3-CDR-V1.0/M157730473LC
4648 pixels from left, 21594 pixels from top
You have to rotate the image 180 degrees to get it correctly oriented.  It is cave/hole H1 by my nomenclature.

Thanks to "Copernicus"!

Geoff

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #43 on: September 23, 2011, 06:59:29 am »
Nice find JF (and Copernicus).

Here is another shot with illumination from the left:


M157730473LC

JFincannon

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Re: JFincannon's Collapsed Voids
« Reply #44 on: September 23, 2011, 01:44:50 pm »
Are you showing the image with the Sun from the left because of the optical illusion impact of it coming from the opposite way?