Author Topic: Interesting terrain  (Read 301581 times)

Geoff

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #30 on: May 12, 2010, 06:14:59 pm »
This looks like a rock fall from the cliff at the bottom:


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000277163.jpg

jules

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #31 on: May 12, 2010, 08:18:34 pm »
Not sure if this is a fault (geological fault!) or graben?

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000351850.jpg
I classed it as linear feature - other linear feature.

jules

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #32 on: May 12, 2010, 09:23:20 pm »
Difficult to know just where to put this one!

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000387909.jpg
On the foot hills of the Apennine Mountains.

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #33 on: May 12, 2010, 11:11:49 pm »
 :o :o :o  That's the MOST amazing Moon pic I've seen yet!!!!  What on Luna could have caused that?  A magma upwelling perhaps?  It looks just like frozen liquid!!!

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #34 on: May 12, 2010, 11:44:21 pm »
I call this one, "The Parrot", after the large rock formation at the top of the picture.


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000351911.jpg

elizabeth

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #35 on: May 13, 2010, 12:08:39 am »
 :) I fine this one interesting. I like the shadow.000027684
Longitude: 312.885
Latitude: 23.4803

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2010, 01:57:04 am »
Oooh, the textures on that pic, Elizabeth!  I want to run my hands over it and feel the rough surface!

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2010, 02:10:02 am »
I swear this looks like a flood zone...or maybe I'm still a bit spooked over the worst floods in our city's history last week.


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000279142.jpg

Thomas J

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2010, 08:58:16 pm »
:) I fine this one interesting. I like the shadow.000027684
Longitude: 312.885
Latitude: 23.4803
This is a great image, the shadow really defines the height of that hill/mound.

ElisabethB

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2010, 10:40:04 pm »
okay, I'm new to this, but I really liked this one  ;)

000277318
Longitude: 312.973
Latitude: 24.0621
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 01:44:07 pm by ElisabethB »

IreneAnt

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #40 on: May 14, 2010, 01:00:02 am »
Wow, lots of interesting images here. I hardly know where to get started.

A few questions:

Does anyone know if there is any way to use the My Moon Zoo feature to see the location and relation to Clementine data for the images that are being discussed (when it's not your image and so isn't in your My Moon Zoo already)? Context is soo important in image interpretation, so any little bit would be helpful.

The minimum crater sizes that can be drawn at each level are:
  High Zoom = 10m
  Med Zoom  = 40m
  Low zoom   = 84m
I'm getting used to the different levels of zoom and using these measurements as a way to find a general scale.
Thomas, how do you know what the zoom level of each image is. I can't find that information given anywhere. Do you just estimate from the level of detail you can see? That can be dangerous since craters can look the same regardless of their scale....

IreneAnt

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #41 on: May 14, 2010, 01:07:33 am »
It is sooo hard to tell without context, but I am wondering if this isn't a bunch of impact melt ponds.
Difficult to know just where to put this one!

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000387909.jpg
On the foot hills of the Apennine Mountains.

Also, I'm wondering if this is a close up of one of those melt ponds (or whatever they are).
Close to Mare Imbrium:


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000332198.jpg

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #42 on: May 14, 2010, 01:09:54 am »
And yet further evidence of possible fluid-like flow on the Moon's Surface.


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000116072.jpg

IreneAnt

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #43 on: May 14, 2010, 01:13:23 am »
I swear this looks like a flood zone...or maybe I'm still a bit spooked over the worst floods in our city's history last week.


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000279142.jpg

I'm wondering if this is mass wasting on the slopes of a big steep crater slope? Loose particles "flowing" downhill due to gravity can behave very much like a fluid....
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 01:15:08 am by IreneAnt »

IreneAnt

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #44 on: May 14, 2010, 01:25:16 am »
Edge of ejecta from a fresh white crater maybe.


I'm guessing we are looking down slope from the rim of a crater. The darker part is the outside of the crater. The lighter part is the slope into the crater; you can see streaks where material has moved down slope towards the upper left corner of the image. This constant down slope movement keeps the material on the slopes fresher, and therefore brighter, than the outside of the crater (which is clearly more weathered and contains numerous smaller craters).