Author Topic: Interesting terrain  (Read 290388 times)

IreneAnt

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #45 on: May 14, 2010, 01:35:06 am »
Oh, what I wouldn't give for context and zoom on this one.

[This post was moved to the "Hyginus Crater formations" thread]
« Last Edit: May 19, 2010, 09:30:34 pm by Geoff »

Anaclaudia

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #46 on: May 14, 2010, 04:18:31 am »
I'm marked sinuous here, on the middle to the top left

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000115113.jpg


Here I marked a lot off sinuous,  :D, and linear features on the left side from the image

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000011806.jpg


Here, on the bottom left are crater chains?

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000280494.jpg



« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 04:37:50 am by Anaclaudia »

Thomas J

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #47 on: May 14, 2010, 07:36:57 am »
Wow, lots of interesting images here. I hardly know where to get started.

A few questions:

Does anyone know if there is any way to use the My Moon Zoo feature to see the location and relation to Clementine data for the images that are being discussed (when it's not your image and so isn't in your My Moon Zoo already)? Context is soo important in image interpretation, so any little bit would be helpful.

The minimum crater sizes that can be drawn at each level are:
  High Zoom = 10m
  Med Zoom  = 40m
  Low zoom   = 84m
I'm getting used to the different levels of zoom and using these measurements as a way to find a general scale.
Thomas, how do you know what the zoom level of each image is. I can't find that information given anywhere. Do you just estimate from the level of detail you can see? That can be dangerous since craters can look the same regardless of their scale....
Irene, this information comes from the case paper, I'll send it to your message box and look for a link. No, of course I haven't just assumed and estimated these figures, that would not be productive at all.   

jules

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #48 on: May 14, 2010, 09:53:05 am »
Wow, lots of interesting images here. I hardly know where to get started.

A few questions:

Does anyone know if there is any way to use the My Moon Zoo feature to see the location and relation to Clementine data for the images that are being discussed (when it's not your image and so isn't in your My Moon Zoo already)? Context is soo important in image interpretation, so any little bit would be helpful.
At the moment there is no facility to do this but I'll put copy your question over to the Team Area (an area on the forum where the Team will look first) as other lunar scientists might find this relevant. The (initial at least) aim of Moon Zoo is to allow interested non-scientists to become involved in useful lunar research without any need to think about context or scale but as we have seen with Galaxy Zoo it is not long before both amateurs and professionals are asking deeper questions! It's early days yet and I'm sure features will be added as the project develops but I think it's useful for the Moon Zoo science team to know now how people are thinking of using the project.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 01:24:40 pm by jules »

jules

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #49 on: May 14, 2010, 09:58:30 am »
It is sooo hard to tell without context, but I am wondering if this isn't a bunch of impact melt ponds.
Difficult to know just where to put this one!

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000387909.jpg
On the foot hills of the Apennine Mountains.

Also, I'm wondering if this is a close up of one of those melt ponds (or whatever they are).
Close to Mare Imbrium:


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000332198.jpg
Interesting you should say that IreneAnt as when I found the top image my initial reaction was that the exposed rocks looked liquid!

Geoff

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #50 on: May 14, 2010, 12:29:20 pm »

weezerd

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #51 on: May 14, 2010, 01:26:31 pm »


I flagged this as a sinuous channel...anyone agree/disagree?
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 03:07:57 pm by weezerd »

IreneAnt

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #52 on: May 14, 2010, 01:57:03 pm »
The minimum crater sizes that can be drawn at each level are:
  High Zoom = 10m
  Med Zoom  = 40m
  Low zoom   = 84m
I'm getting used to the different levels of zoom and using these measurements as a way to find a general scale.
Thomas, how do you know what the zoom level of each image is. I can't find that information given anywhere. Do you just estimate from the level of detail you can see? That can be dangerous since craters can look the same regardless of their scale....
Irene, this information comes from the case paper, I'll send it to your message box and look for a link. No, of course I haven't just assumed and estimated these figures, that would not be productive at all.
Thank you so much for the excerpt from the case paper Thomas. I wasn't thinking that you had estimated the minimum crater diameters at each zoom level - those numbers seemed far too specific to be estimates (so sorry if I wasn't clear on that). I was wondering if we, the image viewers, are expected to estimate which zoom level we are looking at, since that information is not given. I guess the short answer is yes, but it doesn't really matter for the purpose of the tasks we're given. ;)

Geoff

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #53 on: May 14, 2010, 07:29:27 pm »
Don't know what to make of this, looks like icing on a cake - illumination is from the left:


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000036432.jpg

jules

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #54 on: May 15, 2010, 02:05:04 pm »
So just what does cause these neat boundaries between different terrain?  ???

http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000050174.jpg

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #55 on: May 15, 2010, 03:56:29 pm »
ANOTHER "Neat" boundary for you, Jules!


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000277632.jpg

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #56 on: May 15, 2010, 03:58:36 pm »

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #57 on: May 15, 2010, 04:02:06 pm »

Geoff

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #58 on: May 15, 2010, 05:29:51 pm »
More interesting terrain, not sure what the white mound is:


http://moonzoo.s3.amazonaws.com/v10/slices/000114424.jpg

Longitude: 312.639
Latitude: 23.7403

Thornius

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Re: Interesting terrain
« Reply #59 on: May 16, 2010, 04:45:08 am »