Author Topic: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!  (Read 9281 times)

jules

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BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« on: February 20, 2012, 12:12:04 pm »
Please place your boulder explosions here!. This is the kind of thing we are looking for - completely or partially fragmented boulders at the ends of their tracks:



More information here.

JFincannon

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2012, 05:03:15 pm »
Here is one that sort of blew up.
M154805133LC
1829 pixels from left and 11263 from top

Geoff

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2012, 05:27:39 pm »
Nice find!

jules

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2012, 06:59:09 pm »
Well done JF. These are hard to find! I've been through the Boulder and Boulder Track threads too  - no contenders there!

JFincannon

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2012, 10:17:02 pm »
All the harder because most rolling boulder studies in the past only cared about ones that did not lose their shape (crack up) so they could estimate the mass of the boulder.

JFincannon

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2012, 06:14:53 pm »
Not as spectacular as the ones previously shown, but at least visited by Apollo 17 (station 6).
http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a17/a17psr.html

JFincannon

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2012, 06:15:45 pm »
LRO images of the former.  You can see the astronaut tracks in one.

JFincannon

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2012, 06:16:59 pm »
Another boulder around there.

JFincannon

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2012, 06:17:50 pm »
A final one near there.



jules

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2012, 09:19:49 pm »
LRO images of the former.  You can see the astronaut tracks in one.
You beat me to that one!!
Here's a view showing the NAC ref where there are some nice views of the North Massif:
M129086118LC
« Last Edit: February 22, 2012, 09:21:50 pm by jules »

kodemunkey

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2012, 09:19:12 pm »
I think these rocks around schrodinger g qualify?


http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc/view_lroc/LRO-L-LROC-2-EDR-V1.0/M110691019RE

jules

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2012, 09:27:18 pm »
It looks like they have been flung out in the impact rather than rolled there as there are no tracks. The way I have been looking is to:

1. find a track
2. find the end
3. see if the boulder has crumbled. :)

placidstorm

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Re: BOULDER EXPLOSIONS!
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2012, 10:59:43 pm »
You may want to try it a little different Jules . Boulder tracks are hard to spot above 1/mp . However the boulders themselves are pretty bright and gnarly at 4 to 8 mp . If you take the example pic on act and zoom out to your maximum ( eye comfort level ) That you can make out the boulder , you can see the difference in boulders vs crumbly boulders . I've also noticed sussing out downhill from even bigger cliffs can produce pleasing  results .
So I would add ,
1. Search ( at max comfortable zoom level ) for boulder producing areas .
2. Zoom in a bit and look for Fuzzy boulders ( being crumbly they wont be as sharp as a whole rock )
3. Zoom in and look for tracks .

Impact areas can be fun too , if they strike an area where they can dislodge material instead of ejecting it .
Looking in the hills finds some prospects also .

All that being said , I have yet to find a good example myself as all of them seem to have just fallen apart and not exploded .

Even went to the poles to see if something fell out of the frost zone/perpetual shadows , and popped .


This is not an easy task no matter how you go about it , but I think you'll wind up with some intensive boulder expertise by the time it's done !
« Last Edit: February 27, 2012, 02:18:50 pm by placidstorm »